Protein Facts

  • Proteins are long chain-like molecules that are made up of small units known as amino acids, joined together by peptide bonds.
  • Amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, are compounds made up of core chemical elements which are carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen.
  • Proteins are a major nutrient in the body, and without it, an organism will cease to exist.
  • Keratin, a type of protein, is the key structural material making up hair, nails, and the outer layer of the skin.
  • We rely on proteins for rapid growth and formation of muscles.
  • Enzymes, are a class of proteins that speed up biochemical reactions in the body. Pepsin, Trypsin and amylase are enzymes that help in the digestion of food.
  • Lipase and ribonuclease, are enzymes that aid the break down food particles in our stomachs.
  • Protein keeps you fuller because protein boosts the level of Peptide YY (a hormone made in the small intestine which helps reduce appetite and limit food intake).
  • Proteins primarily replace worn out cells and damaged tissues. Human tissues may be impaired from physical or cellular injury, so proteins fix them.
  • Proteins prevent muscle breakdown and muscle loss by promoting muscle cell recovery.
  • Proteins are beneficial to the lungs and airways.
  • Proteins improve heart health by aiding proper blood circulation.
  • Protein is an important building block of bones, muscles, cartilage and skin. Our hair, skin and nails are comprised mostly of protein.
  • Proteins play a central role in blood oxygenation. Blood cells contain a protein compound that carries oxygen throughout the body. This helps supply our entire bodies with the nutrients it needs.
  • Proteins play an important role in hormone regulation, especially during the transformation and development of cells during puberty in adolescents.
  • Proteins supports cell repair and the production of new biological cells.
  • Proteins are vital to muscle growth and muscle healing.
  • Proteins help with body growth and development throughout life.
  • Proteins increase cell turnover (the shedding of old skin cells, hair and nail cells to make room for new cells). These new cells replicate till the next growth cycle in the body.
  • Did you know that the word protein is derived from the Greek word ‘proteios’ which means “primary” or “in the lead”?
  • Proteins were first described by the Dutch chemist Gerardus Johannes Mulder and named by the Swedish chemist Jöns Jacob Berzelius in 1838.
  • Proteins exist in all living things, including the DNA.
  • Proteins can transmit and commute signals from living cells & tissues.
  • Protein rich meals eliminate fatigue from the human body.
  • Soybeans, or Soya, is a remarkable source of protein. Eating soy in any of its forms or derivatives enhances body cells and organs.
  • Proteins grow, maintain, and replace the tissues in our bodies.
  • Therefore, our muscles, organs, and immune systems are mostly made of protein.
  • Proteins are responsible for numerous health benefits, including reduced inflammation, lower blood pressure and improved reduction of cholesterol.
  • Not only are dairy foods like milk, cheese, and yogurt excellent sources of protein, but they also contain valuable calcium, and many are fortified with vitamin D. Choose skim or low-fat dairy to keep bones and teeth strong and help prevent osteoporosis.
  • Protein assists the metabolism of the body in order for it to function properly.
  • Protein fortifies the body against diseases and infections.
  • Protein helps the body fight against heart diseases.
  • Protein helps the body operate at peak performance.
  • Proteins can be found in the alimentary canals of bees, meaning that proteins are present in honey.
  • Proteins improve the overall memory of an individual.
  • Milk contains the following: an albumin, α-lactalbumin; a globulin, beta-lactoglobulin; and a phosphoprotein, All these give milk its creamy white colour and its high nutritional value.
  • Proteins have three major types which have sub-divisions. They are: fibrous proteins, globular proteins, and membranous proteins.
  • Fibrous proteins provide structural support for cells and tissues in the body. Examples are keratin, myosin and elastin.
  • Globular proteins provide human cells with energy. Examples include haemoglobin, insulin, and albumin.
  • Membranous proteins provide insulation to cellular membranes. Examples are peripheral proteins, trans- membrane proteins and integral proteins.
  • Fibrous proteins, also known as scleroproteins, form connective tissues, tendons, bone matrices, and muscle fibres in the human body.
  • Proteins build and repair worn down cells and tissues.
  • Proteins provide most of the molecular machinery of cells.
  • The SARS – COV 2, a contagion that causes the coronavirus, is a harmful protein. They are harmful, tiny, nucleoproteins enclosed within a spiked capsid comprised of matrix protein.
  • Ordinarily, the coronavirus isn’t harmful on the surface of the human skin, but becomes dangerous when it enters the nose and respiratory system.
  • Simple ways to protect yourself include eating healthy foods (including protein rich meals) to boost your immunity.
  • Proteins fortify the body against diseases and infections by boosting the immune system.
  • Proteins help the immune system to fight off infections.
  • Proteins boost the immune system by repairing immune helper cells in the blood stream.
  • Proteins reduce stress levels and enhance psychological health.
  • Proteins reduce fatigue in the body.
  • Proteins assist muscle cell and ligament restoration.
  • Proteins also promote growth and development in babies and children.
  • In children, proteins aid in bone formation and osteotrophy, the process of bone marrow formation.
  • Proteins make up the osseous tissue in the bone marrow, which is vital for red blood cell and white blood cell formation.
  • Amino Acids are basically the building blocks of proteins. These amino acids play very significant roles in body metabolism.
  • Complete proteins sources are protein sources that have all amino acids including essential amino acids. Examples are soy beans, poultry, fish, dairy products, eggs, and meat.
  • Incomplete protein sources are protein sources that do not have all the essential amino acids. Examples include nuts, grains, fruits, and vegetables.
  • Essential amino acids cannot be created by the body. They must be obtained from protein food sources.
  • There are nine essential amino acids and thirteen non- essential amino acids.
  • Proteins regulate the amount of nitrogen in our circulatory system.
  • An amino acid in the blood called tryptophan, regulates our appetite.
  • Tryptophan improves brain metabolism and regulates our sleep patterns.
  • Tryptophan is also a precursor to serotonin, a chemical that helps us sleep better.
  • Human blood serum contains protein, two-thirds of which are albumins, globulins and other ions.
  • Tryptophan maintains proper nitrogen balance in the body.
  • Tryptophan improves blood flow to the nervous system and gives us a healthy appetite.
  • Lysine, an amino acid, plays a major role in protein synthesis, hormone and enzyme production.
  • Lysine aids the cells in the production of collagen.
  • Collagen improves overall skin health and reduces dryness.
  • Hormones are protein fluids secreted by the cells of endocrine glands, and they act as chemical messengers that transmit signals from one cell to another.
  • An example of a hormone is insulin, which is secreted by the pancreas to regulate the levels of blood sugar in your body.
  • Insulin also promotes cell division and cell growth.
  • Blood proteins, also termed plasma proteins, are proteins present in the blood stream.
  • Plasma proteins serve many different functions, including transport of lipids, hormones, vitamins and minerals.
  • Proteins promote red and white blood cell formation in the body.
  • Phenylalanine, an amino acid, contributes to the relief of pain in the body.
  • It plays a key role in protecting the human skin from harmful ultra violet (UV) rays of the sun.
  • It repairs worn out skin and dermal tissues.
  • Proteins are essential in the formation of the protective layers of the skin.
  • Threonine, an amino acid, is responsible for the formation of collagen, which protects our hands and feet.
  • Threonine forms muscle tissue, which is vital for maintaining muscle mass.
  • Threonine also helps keep connective tissues and muscles throughout the body strong and elastic, including the heart, where it helps in blood circulation.
  • Arginine, an amino acid, plays an important role in cell division and wound healing.
  • Arginine aids the body in producing epidermal, dermal and hypodermal cells, which are essential for skin regeneration.
  • Arginine assists the body in clotting and covering surface injuries.
  • Arginine helps the body to regulate blood pressure.